Chinese Cyber-terrorism Gives Kadeer More Publicity

cyberterrorism China

Check HERE for update

Rebiya Kadeer and the film 10 Conditions of Love and the Melbourne Film Festival continue to be the focus of international attention, thanks to a group of anarchic China-based hackers.

Hackers broke into the Melbourne International Film Festival’s official website and replaced festival information with the Chinese flag and anti-Kadeer slogans.  The site was subsequently subjected to spam attacks.  Meanwhile Festival Director Richard Moore’s email account was inundated with abusive messages since the day he refused to comply with Chinese Government’s insolent demand to withdraw the Kadeer film from the program.  The matter is now under police investigation.  Initial findings indicate that the attacks originated from China.

Computer hacking is classified in International Law under “Terrorism”.  To be precise, it is called “Cyber-terrorism”.

My understanding is that the Chinese Government is very keen to seek cooperation from international communities to fight terrorism.  I am therefore calling upon Chinese authorities, particularly Chinese government’s representatives in Australia, to fully cooperate with Victorian Police and Australian Federal Police in their efforts to track down those China-based hackers who have committed such acts of cyber-terrorism. 

I also suggest that the Australia Government should issue travel warnings to Australians who plan to travel to China.  The Chinese language media in the PRC has been using both the Stern Hu scandal and the Kadeer film as excuses to launch an anti-Australia campaign.  There is also evidence to suggest that the Chinese government is trying hard to conceal this anti-Australia sentiment by blocking similar reports from appearing in its English language newspapers.  Take the Global Times as an example.  Many reports about the MIFF have appeared in its Chinese edition in the last few days.  One of these online reports has attracted more than 500 anti-Australia comments.  These reports were instantly copied and disseminated at major Internet portals in China.  However, up till now not a single report about the MIFF had appeared in the English edition of the Global Times.

The Chinese Government has used similar tactics of appealing to public sentiment in its dealings with the French.  In this difficult economic climate, the Chinese Government will use all tricks available to extort concessions from trading partners, or to shift blame away from the Communist leadership.  Therefore I remind the Australian Foreign Affairs Ministry to advise caution.  There are good reasons to be concerned about the safety of Australians in China.

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14 Responses to Chinese Cyber-terrorism Gives Kadeer More Publicity

  1. Dee says:

    Thanks for a well needed reminder of the manipulation that goes on day by day by China interfering in other countries own business. What I cant see is much press in Australia on this but in my mind this is the most serious news out there right now. I have checked the MIFF website and its still being attached as we speak.

  2. Pingback: Chinese Cyber-terrorism Gives Kadeer More Publicity (Update) « Under the Jacaranda Tree

  3. Melissa says:

    I agree with you Dee this is probably the most important news here in Australia at the moment. Having bought film festival tickets online this year i checked my email this morning to find it had been spammed by MIFF.

    Its very unfortunate that ordinary Chinese citizens should think they have the right, in fact the moral obligation to do this to the ordinary citizens of another country who have done nothing but exercise the right to go to a film festival.

    The unfortunate part is that this hits home for me even harder than that since i am married to a Chinese man and whose family over in China have actually got sucked into all the Goebbels style propaganda on CCTV about the whole MIFF/Kadeer business.

    I have a deep respect for China and its people (obviously since i’m married to one of its citizens :) but i cant believe that we have to be subjected to this kind of Soviet style cyber attacks that Russia inflicted on Estonia last year over that country exercising its right as a sovereign nation to move a statue??!!

    As always the situation is complicated that over in China this is the only “right” and “moral” way to express their anger and frustrations about the society they live in; with the government giving a window of opportunity to inflict petty vandalism on the perceived enemies such as Japan over the war shrine and the US over the embassy bombing in Serbia in the 90s. Just never thought it would be Australia over something like this…

  4. C.A Yeung says:

    Welcome Dee and Melissa,

    Dee, the hacking incident has been quite widely covered by Australian media. Traffic for this blog has also been unusually high in the past 2 days with most visits coming from Australia. This indicates that Australians are concerned about the incident and its implications for Australia. However, we tend not to be too melodramatic about it. It may not be wise to give the hackers too much publicity. Otherwise it will encourage copycat behaviour.

    Melissa, I agree with you that the way public opinion is manipulated in China is truly disturbing. It’s particularly difficult for people like you and me, who are at the crossroad between 2 cultures. I don’t know whether you read Chinese or not. If you do, you may find the discrepancy between Chinese news for domestic consumption and Chinese news for foreign consumption even more alarming. The English language news from China has been carefully polished by CCP’s spin doctors to make China look normal, rational and respectable. They are very different from the kind of xenophobic, racist and delusional paranoia that the Chinese media are feeding their domestic audience.

    It looks as if Japan is going to be the next target for Chinese cyber terrorists. At the moment, a heated discussion is going on at the Global Times about how Japan should be punished for issuing a visa to Rebiya Kadeer. The fenqings both at the Global Times and at Anti-CNN are calling for overseas Chinese in Japan and in Australia to organise protest against Kadeer’s visit. They are also discussing ways of punishing overseas Chinese who are “disloyal” to their Chinese heritage. In short, it’s like the Boxer Rebellion all over again.

  5. Pingback: Rumours about the GFW « Under the Jacaranda Tree

  6. Gary McKenzie says:

    F#*k China. Who do they think they are. They are a murderous, communist, anti-humanity regime with big ideas about their own worth in the world. They make crap products, they kill their own people and sell their organs on the black market. They deserve to be crushed under a new revolution, which I predict will occur within ten years. They attack Indian lands, they kill innocent Buddhists because they don’t believe in religion, they are the new scum of the earth and don’t deserve any consideration from the rest of the world. They are the new bullies of the world. To hell with them!

  7. Gary McKenzie says:

    To hell with your moderation. The whole world should boycott Chinese products to show them we don’t need their crap. Useless, corrupt, communist bastards!

  8. C.A. Yeung says:

    Gary,

    For some reasons your comments have been zapped by WordPress’s spam filter. I’ve just manually retrived them for publishing. Sorry for the delay.

  9. Elise says:

    C.A. Yeung, the MIFF hacking incident is not the only or even the most serious IT incident being investigated at the moment.

    I suspect we are not being told more publicly, because of the fear of aggravating an already serious diplomatic problem with China, as you have said.

    Agree that there are good reasons to be concerned about the safety of Australians in China. However, it is beginning to look like the problem is much bigger than that.

  10. Anon says:

    I wonder how long before anti-Chinese sentiment becomes more and more widespread. They complained last year when they didn’t get any attention for their rallies “defending” the Olympic torch; little do they realize that the “western media” probably did them a favor, because most people in the west would find the idea of students rallying in SUPPORT of their government- and a nasty one at that- revolting and ass-backwards.

  11. Anon says:

    “Melissa, I agree with you that the way public opinion is manipulated in China is truly disturbing. It’s particularly difficult for people like you and me, who are at the crossroad between 2 cultures. I don’t know whether you read Chinese or not. If you do, you may find the discrepancy between Chinese news for domestic consumption and Chinese news for foreign consumption even more alarming. The English language news from China has been carefully polished by CCP’s spin doctors to make China look normal, rational and respectable. They are very different from the kind of xenophobic, racist and delusional paranoia that the Chinese media are feeding their domestic audience.”

    YES. Tailoring the message for different audiences isn’t really surprising, but it makes me sick how the Global Times can present itself as half-reasonable in English and then be all but inciting the next Boxer Rebellion in Chinese. The comments are so vile that I get closer to turning into a full-fledged racist every time I go there. Sad fate for someone who invested ten years in the language.

  12. Anon says:

    One more post, I’m afraid- here’s some more Chinese-Australian tension: http://society.huanqiu.com/photos/2009-08/536240.html for Australians this might not relate to recent events, but given the way Chinese look at things, (I mean, I saw a lot of people say that the murder of the [ethnic] Chinese family in Sydney was connected to the Rio Tinto affair, or even that that it was Australian government retribution- are these people for fucking real?) it’s hard to imagine that anti-Australian feelings didn’t come into things somewhere along the line. The comments make the connection, as expected.

  13. Pingback: The enticing life of Rebiya Kadeer « The best mixtures are fusions of the most diverse ingredients

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